Uncommon Ground

How to think about replication

Caroline Tucker reviewed a paper by Nathan Lemoine and colleagues in late September and reminded us that inferring anything from small, noisy samples is problematic.1 Ramin Skibba now describes a good example of the problems that can arise.

In 1988, Fritz Strack and his colleagues reported that people found cartoons funnier if they held a pen in their teeth than if they held it between their lips. Why? Because holding a pen between your teeth causes you to smile, while holding one between your lips causes you to pout. This report spawned a series of studies on the “facial feedback hypothesis”, the hypothesis that facial expressions influence our emotional states. It seems plausible enough, and I know that I’ve read advice along this line in various places even though I’d never heard of the “facial feedback hypothesis” until I read Skibba’s article.

Unfortunately, the hypothesis wasn’t supported in what sounds like a pretty definitive study: 17 experiments and 1900 experimental subjects. Sixteen of the studies had large enough samples to be confident that the failure to detect an effect wasn’t a result of small sample size. Strack disagrees. He argues that (a) using a video camera to record participants may have made them self-conscious and suppressed their responses and (b) the cartoons were too old or too unfamiliar to participants to evoke an appropriate response.

Let’s take Strack at his word. Let’s assume he’s right on both counts. How important do you think the facial feedback to emotions is if being recorded by a video camera or being shown the wrong cartoons causes it to disappear (or at least to be undetectable)? I don’t doubt that Strack detected the effect in his sample, but the attempt to replicate his results suggest that the effect is either very sensitive to context or very weak.

I haven’t gone back to Strack’s paper to check on the original sample size, but the problem here is precisely what you’d expect to encounter if the original conclusions were based on a study in which the sample size was small relative to the signal-to-noise ratio. To reliably detect a small effect that varies across contexts requires either (a) very large sample size (if you want your conclusions to apply to the entire population) or (b) very careful specification of the precise subpopulation to which your conclusions apply (and extreme caution in attempting to generalize beyond it).

Skibba, R. 2016. Psychologists argue about whether smiling makes cartoons funnier. Nature doi: 10.1038/nature.2016.20929


1See this post for my take and for links to some earlier posts that describe the problems in more detail.

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