Analyzing the genetic structure of populations: the Wahlund effect and F-statistics

Last we we had a whirlwind tour of inbreeding. During this class period, we'll explore another way in which populations may depart from random mating. It's very rare that we will study a single, well-mixed population in which all individuals are equally likely to mate with one another. More often, we'll study multiple populations that are geographically distant from one another, at least relative to the typical dispersal distance of individuals. When populations are geographically structure mating will be non-random simply because individuals that are geographically close to one another are more likely to mate than those that are far apart. If any of you happen to be community ecologists, think about the difference between alpha, beta, and gamma diversity in communities and you'll have a hint of where we're going.

  • R Shiny app illustrating the difference between Nei's statistics and Weir and Cockerham's statistics

Online notes

Analyzing the genetic structure of populations: the Wahlund effect and F-statistics

Associated readings

Holsinger, K.E., and B.S. Weir. 2009. Genetics in geographically structured populations: defining, estimating, and interpreting FST Nature Reviews Genetics 10:639-650 link

Return to lecture schedule